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  • New Model of Blood-Brain Barrier May Aid in Predicting Therapies Able to Best Treat Patients, Scientists Say
    by Catarina Silva on April 24, 2019 at 12:30 pm

    A cellular model that simulates the blood-brain barrier — a membrane that protects against viruses or other insults entering through the blood stream — may help in understanding how potential treatments for neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s could better cross that barrier to reach the brain and central nervous system, its creators at Purdue University report in a news […] The post New Model of Blood-Brain Barrier May Aid in Predicting Therapies Able to Best Treat Patients, Scientists Say appeared first on Alzheimer's News Today. […]

  • Can a blood pressure drug protect the brain from Parkinson's?
    on April 23, 2019 at 4:00 pm

    At blood levels that are typical in humans, an approved high blood pressure drug was able to clear toxic proteins of Parkinson's disease from mouse brains. […]

  • When to Take the Driver’s Seat with Dementia Caregiving
    by Niko Mann on April 23, 2019 at 2:00 pm

    Caring for someone with dementia as they lose independence is challenging, especially when the loved one is your parent. Parents are accustomed to guiding their children throughout their lives. When the roles are reversed, it is often difficult for both the patient and the caregiver. Knowing when to assist and when to lead can be […] The post When to Take the Driver’s Seat with Dementia Caregiving appeared first on Alzheimer's News Today. […]

  • Cognitive Training Improves Reasoning and Memory in Adults with Mild Impairment, Pilot Study Finds
    by Patricia Inacio, PhD on April 22, 2019 at 12:00 pm

    Cognitive training alone — without the use of direct brain stimulation — may significantly benefit adults with mild cognitive impairment, a known risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease, a pilot clinical study reports. The study, “Cognitive Training and Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Randomized Pilot Trial,” was published in the journal Frontiers […] The post Cognitive Training Improves Reasoning and Memory in Adults with Mild Impairment, Pilot Study Finds appeared first on Alzheimer's News Today. […]

  • Anti-Inflammatory Naproxen Fails to Prevent Alzheimer’s Progression, Phase 2 Trial Confirms
    by Alice Melão on April 17, 2019 at 12:00 pm

    Treatment with naproxen, an anti-inflammatory medication, failed to prevent the progression of Alzheimer’s in individuals at risk of developing the disease, results from a Phase 2 clinical trial show. The results, “INTREPAD: A randomized trial of naproxen to slow progress of presymptomatic Alzheimer disease,” were published recently in Neurology. Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the accumulation […] The post Anti-Inflammatory Naproxen Fails to Prevent Alzheimer’s Progression, Phase 2 Trial Confirms appeared first on Alzheimer's News Today. […]

  • Alzheimer's: Synthetic protein blocks toxic beta-amyloid
    on April 16, 2019 at 4:00 pm

    Scientists have designed a protein that folds into alpha sheets that can block toxic beta-amyloid in brain cells before it forms into large clumps. […]

  • After Her Big Decision, Mom Just Lets the Good Times Roll
    by Niko Mann on April 16, 2019 at 2:00 pm

    When my mom was diagnosed with terminal uterine cancer, she was displeased to say the least. Being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease just after witnessing her mother pass away from the terrifying disease in 2014 did not exactly bring out the sunshine, either. But she suddenly saw terminal cancer as a silver lining in a dark […] The post After Her Big Decision, Mom Just Lets the Good Times Roll appeared first on Alzheimer's News Today. […]

  • Toll of Family Caregiving on Health is Much Smaller Than Previously Reported, Study Suggests
    by Patricia Inacio, PhD on April 15, 2019 at 12:00 pm

    While caregiving for people with Alzheimer’s and other disorders has a significant detrimental impact on caregivers’ immune system, the association is weak — less than 1% — and may not carry clinical significance, a new study shows. “We’re not saying that family caregiving can’t be stressful, but there’s a notion that it’s so stressful that […] The post Toll of Family Caregiving on Health is Much Smaller Than Previously Reported, Study Suggests appeared first on Alzheimer's News Today. […]

  • Tips to Help Loved Ones Face an Alzheimer’s Diagnosis
    by Ray Burow on April 12, 2019 at 8:00 pm

    The Alzheimer’s Association estimates that nearly 5.8 million people in the United States have the condition. Most people who are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease are 65 or older, but the disease is found across all age groups, including 200,000 with an early-onset diagnosis. The adage that “there’s safety in numbers” doesn’t apply to Alzheimer’s dementia. […] The post Tips to Help Loved Ones Face an Alzheimer’s Diagnosis appeared first on Alzheimer's News Today. […]

  • New Research Unit at England’s University of East Anglia to Study Possible Link Between Sleep and Dementia
    by Mary Chapman on April 12, 2019 at 12:00 pm

    To enable researchers to study prospective links between sleep and dementia, a cutting-edge sleep unit has opened at the University of East Anglia (UEA) in Norwich, England. While sleeping issues commonly occur in dementia, it’s unclear whether diseases such as Alzheimer’s cause the disturbances, or whether problems sleeping signal early disease onset. Scientists will test whether treating […] The post New Research Unit at England’s University of East Anglia to Study Possible Link Between Sleep and Dementia appeared first on Alzheimer's News Today. […]

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